Facebook Marketing for Beginners

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Facebook Marketing for Beginners

So you want to learn how to become a more effective Facebook marketer? You came to the right place. Everyone agrees that social media sites are a great tool to use for marketing – if done with finesse. Own Facebook, and you’ll enjoy more SERP presence, deliver limitless messages about your company, and send people right to your doorstep to help you attain credibility and spread your link around the web.

This we know. But where do you start? What can you write about that will get people to click on your page, and how do you get them to come back? There are plenty of guides and tutorials out there that will school you on how to use paid marketing, optimize your posts and drive engagement.

But in a world where we are constantly saying “content is king,” there aren’t too many tutorials on how to write content for your social media page. This guide sets out to change that, by giving you some tips on how to combine “brain-hacking” with your Facebook posts, that is, write things people want to read and write it effectively, so that you “stick.”

 

How to Get Noticed with Pictures

First step, always try to use a picture to integrate with your messages. Studies show that people respond more to pictures, and why wouldn’t we? Our brain is trained to respond to visuals, not text. Choose pictures that elicit curiousness or emotion – that’s how you’ll get your clicks.

Don’t be afraid to use concepts that are unexpected when you choose your visuals. Humorous pictures and content that appeal to our aspirations cause an emotional response that will result in a visit, reply or return because our brains are made to pay attention to the bio-chemistry of emotions.

When you use your pictures on Facebook, put the main bullet point of your message within the picture itself, as opposed to a caption at the bottom or to the side of the picture. What this does is throw the brain off-guard, causing it to step back and try to make sense out of how the words and pictures relate. As it’s studying the picture, the neurons in the brain are firing, causing it to suck in the ideas of the message more.

Finally, keep up the good work by always trying to use pictures of people throughout your marketing campaign. Human beings respond naturally to other humans more-so than pictures of products.   Although cheesy stock photos of a smiling man holding a “world’s best boss” cup aren’t particularly effective, there are plenty of ways you can capture an image of a person looking natural without having to resort to that.

 

What to Write About

Write about things that your audience will feel is helpful, and keep your writing interesting. When content causes a feeling like interest, it is more likely that your message will be remembered, even if the initial feeling is humor, curiosity or suspense.

Also, keep your writing style conversational. Human beings know that they need to respond to conversation, so reading a conversation will keep them alert, soaking in the information you are conveying more thoroughly. Conversely, if we are reading copy that is dry and sterile, we respond as if we are sitting through a lecture – we still might be willing to put the time in and listen, but the message we receive won’t be as poignant.

When you post messages that are important, utilize redundancy. That is, find a way to say the same thing differently and with different types of media. This will increase the chances that the information you want to convey will be “coded” into the brain.

Use your Facebook posts to explain what you want to say with different styles. While one customer might just be looking for a quick example, there’s always someone else who wants to see the big picture. Appeal to both sides of the brain with your posts and messages, effectively engaging it. The more brain that is being engaged, the more likely it is that the owner of that brain will stay focused on a webpage.

Just like putting text within your pictures, don’t be afraid to present your audience with stories that introduce more than one point of view to catch your audience’s brains offguard. When confronted with the need to make judgments and evaluations, the brain is more efficient at taking in messages.

Finally, post many questions to your audience to increase engagement, but also ask questions from them that don’t always have one straight answer. If the question is intriguing enough to prompt a response, people will spend time thinking about your message to write a satisfactory reply, and the brain learns and remembers more when it has to work at something.

If you consistently follow these pointers, you will get more activity on your Facebook page, and the ideas you need to express will more effective, memorable and engaging. Keep sending the right message you’ll be on your way to Facebook domination in no time.

So you want to learn how to become a more effective Facebook marketer? You came to the right place. Everyone agrees that social media sites are a great tool to use for marketing – if done with finesse. Own Facebook, and you’ll enjoy more SERP presence, deliver limitless messages about your company, and send people right to your doorstep to help you attain credibility and spread your link around the web.

This we know. But where do you start? What can you write about that will get people to click on your page, and how do you get them to come back? There are plenty of guides and tutorials out there that will school you on how to use paid marketing, optimize your posts and drive engagement.

But in a world where we are constantly saying “content is king,” there aren’t too many tutorials on how to write content for your social media page. This guide sets out to change that, by giving you some tips on how to combine “brain-hacking” with your Facebook posts, that is, write things people want to read and write it effectively, so that you “stick.”

 

How to Get Noticed with Pictures

First step, always try to use a picture to integrate with your messages. Studies show that people respond more to pictures, and why wouldn’t we? Our brain is trained to respond to visuals, not text. Choose pictures that elicit curiousness or emotion – that’s how you’ll get your clicks.

Don’t be afraid to use concepts that are unexpected when you choose your visuals. Humorous pictures and content that appeal to our aspirations cause an emotional response that will result in a visit, reply or return because our brains are made to pay attention to the bio-chemistry of emotions.

When you use your pictures on Facebook, put the main bullet point of your message within the picture itself, as opposed to a caption at the bottom or to the side of the picture. What this does is throw the brain off-guard, causing it to step back and try to make sense out of how the words and pictures relate. As it’s studying the picture, the neurons in the brain are firing, causing it to suck in the ideas of the message more.

Finally, keep up the good work by always trying to use pictures of people throughout your marketing campaign. Human beings respond naturally to other humans more-so than pictures of products.   Although cheesy stock photos of a smiling man holding a “world’s best boss” cup aren’t particularly effective, there are plenty of ways you can capture an image of a person looking natural without having to resort to that.

 

What to Write About

Write about things that your audience will feel is helpful, and keep your writing interesting. When content causes a feeling like interest, it is more likely that your message will be remembered, even if the initial feeling is humor, curiosity or suspense.

Also, keep your writing style conversational. Human beings know that they need to respond to conversation, so reading a conversation will keep them alert, soaking in the information you are conveying more thoroughly. Conversely, if we are reading copy that is dry and sterile, we respond as if we are sitting through a lecture – we still might be willing to put the time in and listen, but the message we receive won’t be as poignant.

When you post messages that are important, utilize redundancy. That is, find a way to say the same thing differently and with different types of media. This will increase the chances that the information you want to convey will be “coded” into the brain.

Use your Facebook posts to explain what you want to say with different styles. While one customer might just be looking for a quick example, there’s always someone else who wants to see the big picture. Appeal to both sides of the brain with your posts and messages, effectively engaging it. The more brain that is being engaged, the more likely it is that the owner of that brain will stay focused on a webpage.

Just like putting text within your pictures, don’t be afraid to present your audience with stories that introduce more than one point of view to catch your audience’s brains offguard. When confronted with the need to make judgments and evaluations, the brain is more efficient at taking in messages.

Finally, post many questions to your audience to increase engagement, but also ask questions from them that don’t always have one straight answer. If the question is intriguing enough to prompt a response, people will spend time thinking about your message to write a satisfactory reply, and the brain learns and remembers more when it has to work at something.

If you consistently follow these pointers, you will get more activity on your Facebook page, and the ideas you need to express will more effective, memorable and engaging. Keep sending the right message you’ll be on your way to Facebook domination in no time.

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